Qua Humbug

"Turn from the glittering bribe thy scornful eye / Nor sell for gold what gold could never buy."

theparisreview:

Celebrate P. G. Wodehouse’s birthday with Love Among the Chickens, one of his earliest and strangest novels.
1950sunlimited:

For Vampires…

1950sunlimited:

For Vampires…

(via 1950sunlimited)

“The spirit of truth can dwell in science on condition that the motive prompting the [scientist] is the love of the object which forms the stuff of his investigations. That object is the universe in which we live. What can we find to love about it if it isn’t its beauty? The true definition of science is this: the study of the beauty of the world.”

—   Simone Weil, The Need for Roots (1943)

(Source: ayjay, via chairohs)

“We were carried up as it were to heaven, and then down again into the deep: our soul melted within us, because of trouble; Then cried we unto thee, O Lord: and thou didst deliver us out of our distress.”

—   From “A Hymn of Praise and Thanksgiving after a dangerous Tempest.” 1662 Book of Common Prayer. Forms of Prayer to Be Used at Sea.

(Source: Spotify)

discardingimages:

hipster Moses
Bible, Hagenau ca. 1441-1449.
Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg, Cod. Pal. germ. 19, fol. 141v

discardingimages:

hipster Moses

Bible, Hagenau ca. 1441-1449.

Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg, Cod. Pal. germ. 19, fol. 141v

“So there will be two ways to wear the new Apple Watch, and the even more powerful and intimate devices yet to come: to treat it like a tool, or to treat it like magic. We can see this watch as just one more tool—one more way to move mindfully (and watchfully?) through an enduringly mysterious world. Not as a way to master ourselves or our surroundings, but as a way to be reminded of, and grounded in, our embodied limitations. One of Apple’s promotional images for the new Watch showed it reminding its owner to stand up and walk around after sitting too long (presumably in front of a screen). That’s the kind of simple, humbling prompt we human beings need. Or we can indulge the hope that this device (or some new version just down the road) will free us from our limits—will help us know what we cannot know and avoid what we cannot avoid. Wear the Watch that way, and you’ll not only be disappointed—along the way you’ll miss much of what actually makes life worth living. As with all technology, the choice with the Apple Watch will come down to this: to wear it like a human being, or wear it like a god.”

—   Andy Crouch

I could listen to the first track by Wim Mertens on this playlist again and again…

(Source: Spotify)

“Thinking is not speaking. It is a very difficult thing to discover and acquire the language of one’s own thought. Each separate individual is very likely original in his thought. But between his thought and its fit expression the well established common language stands like an enormous, impenetrable wall, like an all-devouring monster, like a steam-roller levelling everything down. Only the whole strength of love, only a loving strength, and strength joined to humility and devotion can make it personal, and yet in such a way that it remains the common tongue.”

—   Theodor Haecker, Journal in the Night. Entry 366, 1940.

“When my son Reinhard was a year old, and for weeks on end had attacks of croup every night, almost choking to death, everything became dark before my eyes, for I could not and cannot see in this the faintest glimmer of reason, it is utterly unintelligible. Man has no immediate consciousness of the innumerable generations that preceded him or of those that are to follow. Ten or a million are all one. Everything that a generation experiences in the way of misfortune happens, where immediate consciousness is concerned, just once. And yet it happened and happens probably for millions of years. That is reflective knowledge. And it creates difficulties. It puts the unanswerable question: why this endless repetition of unspeakable misfortunes through thousands of generations? That is where faith has to fight its hardest battles. And it can be seen that reflection, where the stream of knowledge always runs thin, is its greatest opponent, and its most dangerous one.”

—   Theodor Haecker